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7 pointers to better health

Dr Rosenbaum PharmD

Seven Balance Point Model To Better Health

By Dr. Cathy Rosenbaum

Holistic Clinical Pharmacist

How would you define health? For many of us, health is strictly focused on our physical condition.  Yet, holistic teachings guide us to equally consider value in body, mind, and spiritual health.  I’d like to propose there are at least seven aspects to explore when planning a health and wellness regimen.  We will call these aspects taken together ‘the seven balance point model’ for healing and wellness (e.g., physical, nutrition/supplements, sleep, exercise, social, emotional, and spiritual health).  Here is a brief summary of each aspect.

Physical: It’s important to select and develop a good relationship with your primary care physician who will coordinate your traditional and non-traditional health care team as you partner to develop a personalized health regimen.  Keep up with maintenance and preventative testing as directed by him/her.  We all need a 50,000 mile tune up from time to time just like with our cars!

Nutrition/Supplements: The Mediterranean Diet is considered the world’s gold standard diet for healthy eating and is evidence based. Read about this strategy and try to incorporate more beans, nuts, oily fish, antioxidant rich fruits and vegetables, and monounsaturated fatty acids like extra virgin olive oil into your diet. You’ll be amazed at how much better you start to feel.  Use dietary supplements sparingly at the advice and consent of your healthcare practitioner.  Supplements can never replace good nutrition or eating whole organic foods.

Sleep: Try to get 7-8 hours of sleep at night.  If you have trouble sleeping, drink a glass of milk or decaffeinated green tea before bedtime.  Milk contains tryptophan and green tea contains L-theanine, both of which are relaxing constituents.  Keep your bedroom very cool to allow the body’s natural melatonin levels to rise and help you fall asleep.  Place a drop of lavender essential oil on your pillow as a relaxing fragrance. Play soft music with nature sounds at bedtime.  Light candles to make the room inviting (but be careful not to burn down the house); extinguish them before retiring.

Exercise: We need about 30 minutes of moderate exercise most days of the week.  Walking qualifies and is easy for many of us to do around the neighborhood, at the club, mall, or even at work.  Walking in nature is even better to encourage us to drink in earth’s beauty and become one with the universe.

Social: Develop relationships and friends for your emotional support and for whom you may be a good support in return.  We were not placed on this earth to be isolated.  Being around others helps us feel more alive and stay young.

Emotional Health: Forgive others and self.  Manage your stress with regular massages, laughter, and musical enjoyment.  Dancing is a fabulous outlet to bring a smile to your face.  Deep breathing is a Yoga technique and helps center and calm for stressful times in life.  Try it sometime and see for yourself.  As much as possible, try to focus on the positives in life and change the mental tape if you start to think negative thoughts.

Spiritual Health: Again, spend more time in nature. Explore your understanding of a higher power. Focus on the big picture in life.  Volunteer in your community and give back to serve others and give thanks for your blessings.

Good luck and may you be blessed in body, mind, and spirit.

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Have you heard of quercetin – if not read on…

Quercetin is a natural substance, known as a bioflavonoid, that’s found in red wine, onions, and green tea. It’s been clinically shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause. They also help keep LDL (“bad”) cholesterol from being damaged, which scientists think may contribute to heart disease. growing interest in this compound has developed with the finding that it acts like an antihistamine and an anti-inflammatory. some research also indicates that it may help protect against heart disease and cancer.
At this time of year hayfever and allergic asthma starts to peek. Since quercetin prevents immune cells from releasing histamines, chemicals that cause allergic reactions, its use at this time of year may offer new hope to hay fever sufferers. Researchers think that quercetin may help reduce symptoms of allergies, including runny nose, watery eyes and may be hives.
Work on quercetin is ongoing and the research data is accululating with good indications that as a natural supplement it may help in the battle against heart disease. It has been noted that since it prevents LDL cholesterol from being damaged buy oxidation artery disease may be prevented.  One study found that people who took quercetin and an alcohol-free red wine extract (which contains quercetin) had less damage to LDL cholesterol. Recent studies have also found a positive effect in cases of prostatitis. This condition is typically difficult to manage so the use of a simple supplement may come as great relief to prostatitis sufferers!
As previopusley mentioned, this compound is found normally in the diet. Fruits and vegetables (particularly citrus fruits, apples, onions, parsley, tea, and red wine) are the best dietary sources of quercetin. Olive oil, grapes, dark cherries, and dark berries (especially the dark coloured ones eg.blueberries, blackberries, and bilberries) are also high in flavonoids, including quercetin. Eating a diet rich in these is always a good idea but those with specific health needs will probably find a supplement a good idea.
In general, for allergy problems its woirth trying 500-600mg per day increasing to 500mg twice a day in cases of severe inflammation such as prostatitis.
As far as interactions with drugs goies, its generally accecpted that blood thinners such as Warfarin (Coumadin), Clopidogrel (Plavix) and Aspirin may interact with quercetin and its not recommended that you take it if you are on these. There is some suggestion that the immune suppressant drug called Cyclosporine may pose a problem because of quercetins ability to apparently blosk its absorbtion. Other drugs that have been implicated as interaction are nifedipine, and felodipine.
Quercetin is a natural substance, known as a bioflavonoid, that’s found in red wine, onions, and green tea. It’s been clinically shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause. They also help keep LDL (“bad”) cholesterol from being damaged, which scientists think may contribute to heart disease. growing interest in this compound has developed with the finding that it acts like an antihistamine and an anti-inflammatory. some research also indicates that it may help protect against heart disease and cancer.At this time of year hayfever and allergic asthma starts to peek. Since quercetin prevents immune cells from releasing histamines, chemicals that cause allergic reactions. On that basis, researchers think that quercetin may help reduce symptoms of allergies, including runny nose, watery eyes and may be hives. Work on quercetin is ongoing and the research data is accululating with good indications that as a natural supplement it may help in the battle against heart disease. It has been noted that since it prevents LDL cholesterol from being damaged buy oxidation artery disease may be prevented.  One study found that people who took quercetin and an alcohol-free red wine extract (which contains quercetin) had less damage to LDL cholesterol. Recent studies have also found a positive effect in cases of prostatitis. This condition is typically difficult to manage so the use of a simple supplement may come as great relief to prostatitis sufferers! As previopusley mentioned, this compound is found normally in the diet. Fruits and vegetables (particularly citrus fruits, apples, onions, parsley, tea, and red wine) are the best dietary sources of quercetin. Olive oil, grapes, dark cherries, and dark berries (especially the dark coloured ones eg.blueberries, blackberries, and bilberries) are also high in flavonoids, including quercetin.
Eating a diet rich in these is always a good idea but those with specific health needs will probably find a supplement a good idea.In general, for allergy problems its woirth trying 500-600mg per day increasing to 500mg twice a day in cases of severe inflammation such as prostatitis.
As far as interactions with drugs goies, its generally accecpted that blood thinners such as Warfarin (Coumadin), Clopidogrel (Plavix) and Aspirin may interact with quercetin and its not recommended that you take it if you are on these. There is some suggestion that the immune suppressant drug called Cyclosporine may pose a problem because of quercetins ability to apparently blosk its absorbtion. Other drugs that have been implicated as interaction are nifedipine, and felodipine.

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