Tag Archives: ATP

Helping to combat fatigue and body-energy crises using D-ribose.

What frustrates many people who suffer from fatigue with or without the associated muscular pain known as fibromyalgia is the fact that, on paper, they are too well to be ill. Routine blood tests are typically normal in both situations but the level of pain and fatigue are far from normal and can be life destroying.

Back in August we posted a brief note on the research behind ribose and fatigue. In this post we take it a bit further and explain more of the detail.

It is true to say that there is no known cause for fibromyalgia with all laboratory tests including muscle samples (biopsies) taken from the most tender regions appearing perfectly normal on specialist examination and analysis. This lack of medical evidence places sufferers in a dilemma; how to manage the problem? Exciting work coming out of America is throwing new light on the issue. The latest in a number of small scale studies confirms what has been observed clinically. A simple sugar-like substance, known as ProRibose (contains pure D-ribose), can be of help. The study in question involved 41 sufferers and was set up to investigate the effects of D ribose on two key end points; improvements in pain relief and easing of fatigue. The average age of the study group was 48 years old and 78% were female. This is in keeping with the typical profile of a fibromyalgia and fatigue sufferer. As with many studies, some people dropped out before the test month was finished but of the 36 who completed the trial 69% reported significant improvements in both of the symptoms being investigated and a 25% improvement in quality of life, as assessed by a special questionnaire. The mechanism behind this exciting set of results is not clear. What is known, however, is that fibromyalgia sufferers have lower levels of the energy molecule called adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and a reduced capacity to make ATP in their muscles. It is also known from previous studies that D-ribose can fuel ATP production. This may, in part, be responsible for the effects of D-ribose supplementation which appears to reduce muscle pain and enhance quality of life for those suffering with fibromyalgia and / or chronic fatigue. D-Ribose, also known simply as ribose, is a simple sugar. Technically known as a 5 carbon monosaccharide, or pentose sugar it is used by all the cells of the body and is an essential compound in energy metabolism. Ribose also provides the structural backbone of our genetic material, DNA and RNA, certain vitamins and other important cellular compounds. If the cellular energy pool is depleted by disease, overwork, or exercise it must be replaced. Supplemental ribose can be viewed as jump-starting the energy manufacturing mechanisms and accelerating the process of energy production. To date D-ribose has been shown to be a safe supplement. Only two side effects have been noted; in very large doses, in excess of 10 grams, loose stools (diarrhoea) has been reported and in similar doses a transient dip in blood sugar levels. However, when using any supplement that contains or influences the blood sugar levels or energy levels it is always recommended that a diabetic patient consults a health professional beforehand. To reduce both of these potential but rare side effects, sensitive individuals should take D-ribose with a carbohydrate meal. Taking D-ribose at the recommended intake of between 2-5 grams per dose is not normally associated with any dose effects. A great advocate of the use of D-ribose in CFS/FM is Dr Jacob Teitelbaum. He has suggested that its critical to use the proper dose for the first 3 weeks, which is 5 grams (5000 mg) three times a day, after which the intake can be dropped to twice a day. Dr Teitelbaum is keen on using D-ribose in CFS/FM patients because he has noted that when people consume D-ribose, their body recognizes that it is different from other sugars and preserves it for the vital work of actually making the energy molecule that powers our hearts, muscles, brains, and every other tissue in the body. With its established association with the energy currency of the cell (ATP) D-ribose provides the key building block of ATP, and the presence of D-ribose in the cell stimulates the metabolic pathway our bodies use to actually make this vital compound. If the cell does not have enough D-ribose, it cannot make ATP. So, when cells and tissues become energy starved, the availability of D-ribose is critical to energy recovery. In his detailed article about D-ribose (available online) Dr Teitelbaum describes how normal, healthy heart and muscle tissue has the capacity to make all the D-ribose it needs. However, when normal tissue is stressed by overexertion, several days of rest will usually allow it to fully recover. The muscle may be sore during recovery, as we frequently see for the three or four days after a hard day of gardening or similar unaccustomed work. Eventually energy levels will be restored and the soreness will disappear. But when the muscle is chronically stressed by disease or conditions that affect tissue energy metabolism, the cells and tissues simply cannot make enough D-ribose quickly enough to recover. Heart and skeletal muscles just don’t have the metabolic machinery they need to make D-ribose very efficiently. The result is chronic, persistent pain, stiffness, soreness, and overwhelming fatigue that may never go away. Given the high level or reported muscular pain in cases of CFS/FM that fit this clinical picture it would appear reasonable to consider a trial of D-ribose following the dose recommendation outlined by Dr Teitelbaum, who as a CFS/FM sufferer himself, takes D-ribose every day. Most natural agents are needed for 4-9 months to help restore deficiencies but if D-ribose works for you its safe to use on a regular basis.

Study supports D-Ribose use

In a very recent study published in the Pain Journal this year, Dr Teitelbaum and colleagues followed 203 diagnosed CFS/FM patients over a 3-weeks course of D-Ribose therapy. They discovered that improvements began in the first week of treatment, and continued to increase at the end of the 3 weeks of treatment. Their findings are summarized below;

61.3 % increase in energy

37% increase in overall well being

29.3% improvement in sleep

30% improvement in mental clarity

15.6% decrease in pain

 

At the end of the study they concluded that D-ribose resulted in markedly improved energy levels, sleep, mental clarity, pain relief, and well being in patients suffering from fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Further Information

The study can be view on line (Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia with D-Ribose– An Open-label, Multicenter Study. The Open Pain Journal, 2012, 5, 32-37).

Useful product link to ProRibose.

 

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Ubiquinol – CoQ10′s biologically active form; is there a difference?

At Hadley Wood Healthcare we are keen on spreading the word… Our colleagues in America have just published a great resource describing the difference between regular CoQ10 and its biologically active form known as ubiquinol.

Here is a taster, you can read the rest at Intergrative Interventions web site;

Coenzyme Q10, or CoQ10, is a fat-soluble, essential quinine molecule found throughout the body. In fact, CoQ10 is so prevalent that it was given the name ubiquinone, from the word “ubiquitous”—found everywhere. Coenzyme Q10 is a natural nutrient that’s found in the mitochondria, the energy-producing organelles present in every cell of the body. Called a “coenzyme” because of its unique ability to participate in chemical reactions yet remain unchanged, CoQ10 assists in two vital cellular activities: adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and free radical scavenging. To carry out these activities, mitochondrial CoQ10 continuously cycles from ubiquinone, its ATP production state, to ubiquinol, its reduced and active state.

If, after reading this, you are interested in taking ubiquinol, click here to learn more about ActiveLife Q10.

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Limited offer on Smart Q10

If you are a co-enzyme Q10 user – read on… We have a special but limited supply of Smart Q10 that is being offered on a but-1-get-1-FREE deal. This is a genuinely unique product and to our knowledge, the only Q10 product that can boast that 21 studies in support of its use.See April 28th blog entry for a list of these studies.

Q10, also referred to as coenzyme Q 10 or ubiquinone, is a natural fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all living cells in the body. CoQ10 has a crucial role as a cofactor in the mitochondrial synthesis of cellular energy. Although it is produced by the body and exists in some dietary sources, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirement.

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The smart choice is Smart-Q10!

What is it and how does it work?
CoQ10, also referred to as coenzyme Q 10 or ubiquinone, is a natural fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all living cells in the body. CoQ10 has a crucial role as a cofactor in the mitochondrial synthesis of cellular energy. Although it is produced by the body and exists in some dietary sources, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirement. A deficiency can result from impaired synthesis due to nutritional deficiencies, increasing age, or increased tissue demands. Numerous diseases may exhibit CoQ10 depletion. CoQ10 also functions as a potent antioxidant.
However, all CoQ10 products are not equal. They vary greatly in quality and absorbability. Serum level determination of CoQ10 in the bloodstream is not necessarily the most important measure of efficacy. In order for it to be fully effective, it must cross the cellular barrier and raise the intracellular levels. The only reliable indicator of CoQ10 supplementation is its presence in cell mitochondria. In central nervous system applications, CoQ10 must pass the blood brain barrier, resulting in increased brain intracellular levels to exert its effects.
Smart Q10™ CoQ10 is currently the only coenzyme Q10 supplement supported by studies that show increased serum levels, increased intracellular levels, and demonstrated ability to cross the blood brain barrier.
Smart Q10 CoQ10 wafers contain coenzyme Q10 emulsified in vitamin E and mixed tocopherols and is formulated with Micosolle®, a proprietary excipient.1 Clinical studies have demonstrated that this process enhances the absorption of CoQ10.
Two different methods can be used for the production of coenzyme Q10. One method is natural and the other is synthetic. The natural process utilizes living organisms and is referred to as a “biological fermentation/extraction process.” Coenzyme Q10 can also be synthesized by a chemical process, which produces a similar, but distinctly different product that contains chemical compounds not found in the natural form. smart Q10 CoQ10 contains the natural form of coenzyme Q10.

The Mitochondria
Mitochondria are highly specialized structures (organelles) within each nucleated cell. The number of mitochondria in a cell depends on the cell’s function. Cells with particularly heavy energy demands, such as heart muscle cells, have more mitochondria than other cells. The mitochondria’s primary responsibility is to capture most of the energy in nutrients and convert it into cellular energy. This energy conversion and storage is a complex, multi-step process that follows a specific pathway.
The converted cellular energy is stored in the energy-yielding molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP) used to fuel the cell’s activities. (This is similar to the energy stored in gasoline that is used to fuel automobiles). Because this process requires oxygen, it is often referred to as cellular respiration. Obtaining as many electrons out of the nutrients as possible is the goal of cellular respiration. That is why part of the pathway is referred to as the electron pathway chain. CoQ10 functions as a vital link in the process of converting nutrients into ATP. Cellular respiration and the electron transport chain are completely dependent on CoQ10.
Mitochondrial Compartments
Mitochondria are encased in double membranes. The smooth outer membrane encloses the periphery of the mitochondria and the inner membrane is enfolded to form the cristae. CoQ10 is found in the cristae folds. Cristae folds provide a large surface area for cellular respiration.
Mitochondria are unusual organelles in that they contain their own deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA).9,10 Insufficient CoQ10 levels may have an effect on cellular respiration and mitochondrial DNA.
Smart Q10™ CoQ10 and Support of Cardiac Health
Cardiac cells require large amounts of uninterrupted energy. They have a greater number of mitochondria and subsequently more CoQ10 than any other type of cell. Because of this association, CoQ10’s support of cardiac health is well researched and documented. CoQ10 supports healthy heart contractility and subsequent circulation, blood pressure, and exercise endurance. Due to Smart Q10 CoQ10’s ability to pass through the cell membrane and enter the mitochondria, enhanced levels can be attained.
Smart Q10™ CoQ10 and Support of the Neurological System
The Blood-Brain Barrier
The blood-barrier is a unique anatomical structure. Simply stated, the cells that make up the blood vessels that provide blood to the brain are extremely close together. This greatly restricts what can and cannot leave the bloodstream and enter the brain. While the blood-brain barrier protects the brain from potentially toxic substances, it can be a significant obstacle to therapy of central nervous system disorders. In order to leave the bloodstream and reach the brain cells, a substance must be able to pass through the tightly connected cells of the capillary walls. Only substances with certain solubilities or those that have a transport system can cross the blood-brain barrier to a significant degree.
Recently, CoQ10 has been studied for its effect in support of neurological health. When CoQ10 crosses the blood-brain barrier, mitochondrial concentrations are increased and clinical results indicate that significant neurosupportive effects follow. Clinical studies have examined the role of CoQ10 in the neurological system.
Smart Q10™ CoQ10 and Support of Immune Health
CoQ10 is necessary for immune health.† Increased free radical activity causes damage to cell membranes, mitochondria, and DNA. Supplementation with CoQ10 provides enhanced antioxidant activity that is supportive of the immune system.
Natural Vitamin E
The common name “vitamin E” is an umbrella term for a family of compounds known as the tocopherols. There are at least 8 forms of tocopherols including, alpha-tocopherol, beta-tocopherol, delta-tocopherol, and gamma-tocopherol. These tocopherols are all naturally created by plants, and when used in vitamin E supplements, are considered natural vitamin E.
Recently, the concomitant administration of vitamin E and CoQ10 has been studied. Research has demonstrated that CoQ10 can improve vitamin E’s antioxidant function and protect it from depletion.
Smart Q10™  and Clinical Trials
The formulation of Smart Q10™ CoQ10 is unique among CoQ10 supplements. Currently, three large multi-center studies investigating Smart Q10™ CoQ10 are ongoing. All of these clinical trials are investigating Smart Q10™ CoQ10 health supportive effects on the nervous system. To date, 21 published studies have used Smart Q10™ CoQ10 in their research.
The 21 Studies and Presentations at Medical Symposiums Utilizing Vitaline® Coenzyme Q10 Dietary Supplement Products:
  1. Matthews RT, Yang L, Browne S, Baik MF. Coenzyme Q10 administration increases brain mitochondrial concentrations and exerts neuroprotective effects. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1998; 95:8892-8897.
  2. Langsjoen P. Overview of the use of CoQ10 in cardiovascular disease. Presented at The First Conference of the International Coenzyme Q10 Association. Boston, Mass, May 21-24, 1998.
  3. Koroshetz W. Huntington’s Disease Clinical Trail. Presented at the First Conference of the International Coenzyme Q10 Association. Boston. Mass, May 21-24, 1998.
  4. Shults CW, Haas RH, Flint Beal M. A possible role of coenzyme Q10 in the etiology and treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Proceedings of First Conference of the International Coenzyme Q10 Association, 95:8892-8897, July 21, 1998.
  5. Beal MF. Coenzyme Q10 as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. Presented at the First Conference of the International Coenzyme Q10 Association. Boston. Mass, May 21-24, 1998.
  6. Beal MF. Energy impairment and Huntington’s disease. Presented at the Mitochondrial Medicine Conference. University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Mitochondrial and Metabolic Disease Center, San Diego, Calif, Feb 19-21, 1998.
  7. Kieburtz K, Rickey T. Co-enzyme Q10 and remacemide: evaluation in Huntington¡¦s disease (CARE-HD). A controlled investigation by the Huntington Study Group. Clinical trial in progress. Institutions participating in the CARE-HD Study: Allegheny University, Baylor College of Medicine, Boston University, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Colorado Neurological Institute, Columbia-Presbyterian, Emory University, Indiana School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Massachusetts General Hospital, Rush-Presbyterian-St.Luke’s Medical Center, Tampa General Hospital, and the universities of Alberta, British Columbia, Calgary, Iowa, Kansas Medical Center, Miami School of Medicine, Michigan, Rochester, Toronto, and Virginia. June 1997-2002.
  8. Langsjoen PH, Langsjoen A, Willis R, Folkers K. Treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with coenzyme Q10. Mol Aspects Med. 1997;18:S145-S151.
  9. Shults CW, Flint Beal MD, Fontaine D, Nakeno K, Haas RH. Absorption, tolerability, and effects on mitochondrial activity of oral coenzyme Q10 in parkinsonian patients. Neurology. 1998;50:793-795.
  10. Flint Beal M, Matthews RT, Tielman A, Shults CW. Coenzyme Q10 attenuates the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetradopyridine (MPTP) induced loss of striatal dopamine and dopaminergic axons in aged mice. Brain Res. 1998;783:109-114.
  11. Flint Beal M, Matthews RT. Coenzyme Q10 in the central nervous system and its potential usefulness in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Mol Aspects Med. 1997;18:S169-S179.
  12. Schwid SR, Mattson DH, Goodman AD. A phase II trial of coenzyme Q10 in MS. Clinical trial in progress. University of Rochester, Department of Neurology, Neuroimmunology Unit, Rochester, New York. 1996-2000.
  13. Koroshetz W. Huntington’s Disease Clinical Trail. Presented at the First Conference of the International Coenzyme Q10 Association. Boston, Mass, May 21-24, 1998.
  14. Shults CW, Haas RH, Passov D, Flint Beal M Coenzyme Q10 levels correlate with the activities of complexes I and II/III in mitochondria from parkinsonian and nonparkinsonian subjects. Ann Neurol. 1997;42:261-264.
  15. Feigin A, Kieburtz K, Como C, et al. Assessment of coenzyme Q10 tolerability in Huntington’s disease. Mov Disord. 1996;11:321-323.
  16. Cros D. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Harvard Medical School- Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Neurology EMG Unit-Bigelow 12, Boston, Mass, 1995-1998.
  17. Tardive Dyskinesia Study Using Coenzyme Q10 and Nicotinamide. Harvard Medical School-Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Freedom Trial Clinic, Erich Lindemann Mental Health Center, Boston, Mass, 1995.
  18. Costeff H. CoQ10 and 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria. Neuropediatric Unit. Loewenstein Hospital Rehabilitation Center, Tel Aviv. Medical School, Raanana, Israel, 1998.
  19. Flint Beal. Neuroprotective strategies for treatment of lesions produced by mitochondrial toxins: implications for neurodegenerative diseases. Neuroscience. 1996;71:1043-1048.
  20. Flint Beal M, Henshaw R, Jenkins BG, Rosen BR, Schulz JB. Coenzyme Q10 and nicotinamide block striatal lesions produced by the mitochondrial toxin malonate. Ann Neurol 1994;36:882-888.
  21. Schulz JB, Henshaw RD, Matthews RT, Flint Beal M. Coenzyme Q10 and nicotinamide and a free radical spin trap protect against MPTP neurotoxicity. Exp Neurol. 1995;132:279-283.

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