Category Archives: Clinic News

A Growing Problem

One of my keen areas of interest is bone health or more specifically the thin bone disease known as osteoporosis.

It is an area of consistent research interest and the influence of diet, nutrition and vitamins is gaining a lot of press. We have come a long way from the idea that bone strength is all about calcium but the message is slow to leak through to the conventional medical community and general public alike. Personally, I feel that many people view bone as a hard, inert and brittle substance similar to the skeleton that use to hang in the corner of the school biology lab. In reality, living bone is a very different. Our skeleton is a highly active metabolic tissue and undergoes a regular process of renewal known as ‘bone turnover’. This process changes with age and is influences by many lifestyle factors.

I was lucky enough to be asked to contribute to an article written by Kate Miller on the subject of bone and joint health; thanks to Natural Product News, you can read the final article here A Growing Problem. By Kate Miller, Natural Product News July/August 2016.

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Did you need that buzz and burn just to feel well… before you got fibromyalgia?

Marcusby Holistic Osteopath, Marcus Webb

Over the years of working with fibromyalgia (FM) sufferers and writing about FM stress always bobs up as a key associated factor closely followed by the inevitable cause and effect argument that tends to ensue with no one really coming out any the wiser! Naturally, suffering from a disabling, medically unexplained and often untreatable condition brings inherent stresses of its own with it, but there is some compelling data suggesting that a pre-FM state of being may exist in many sufferers that is stress sensitive and may possibly form the basis of their system breakdown that ultimately leads on to the clinical picture we know as FM.

It is not uncommon for me to hear how a FM suffer is finding it so hard to get use to a reduced level of activity after being “so busy” or “driven” in work or sports. Many FM sufferers can recall how well they use to multi-task juggling work, family life and the gym without a second thought and how they needed that ‘burn’ at the gym to feel energised and on top of life and if they missed their routine fix of exercise how flat they felt, and this was before they developed FM. The interesting thing with all these stories if just how similar they are; active, driven often very successful individuals now living lives they could never imagine; lives of pain, fatigue, loss of motivation and in many cases social isolation. Naturally, depression and stress are more than likely to develop in such circumstances but what is even more intriguing is the idea that a pre-FM state existed that actually required all the stimuli of multi-tasking, the work-buzz and the physical burn of the gym just to keep that person feeling normal. The key tipping point is when it all stopped… that’s when the system crashed and burned.

Within the FM community, how many times do we hear the story of how well everything was going before that ‘virus’ hit and confined the person to bed for some time or that ‘injury’ took the person out of circulation for a good while as it healed. Alternatively, someone’s entire life and routine could be blown out of the water by a bereavement or redundancy at work. A virus, an injury, loss/bereavement, redundancy… there are all very common triggers for FM but are they actually to blame or were they simply the catalyst that broke the behaviours that simply kept the person going? Data to support this theory does exist and revolves around exercise-based research. We now know that within a group of healthy individuals who are exposed to regular exercise some develop widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and mood disturbances (the same or very similar profile to that of FM) after a brief period of the exercise withdrawal while some don’t. Even more profound was the fact that the symptomatic individuals, who appeared to suffer so badly following the withdrawal of their exercise, also displayed other typical features of FM such as altered autonomic function, reduced immune (especially NK-cell) responsiveness and other bodily reactions typical of hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) dysfunction. In essence, they appeared to develop all or many of the clinical features of FM!

The authors of the study suggested that, in some, there exists a pre-existing hypo-functioning stress system that requires regular stimulus just to remain normally stimulated. This mechanism follows the principles of what is known as ‘allostasis’, in which the body seeks to maintain balance, and may explain why so many FM sufferers report living very active, stimulating and to onlookers stressful lives prior to developing FM. It appears that while they were unknowingly self-medicating with stimulus from all angles they were doing so simply to feel normal; it was the only way they could kick their hypo-functioning stress systems into life. However, with this theory comes further questions such as why do some people have hypo-functioning stress system to start with? The possible answers to this part of the puzzle may lie in the long accepted association between early life stress and a dysfunctional stress regulating systems. It is known that early life stress is strongly linked to the development of FM with the pivotal trigger being an over or under active stress regulating system; it is known that early life stress can trigger one or the other. In the case of an under active stress regulating system, having a life full of stimulus and arousal not only distracts from us from dwelling on negative life events it also stimulates the body and maintains a normal level of being. Anything that interferes with this will tip the body into a negative spiral both emotionally and physically as the full effects of the underactive HPA system kicks in. With prolonged removal from life events and routines that enhance arousal a chronic state of low HPA activity becomes the normal and the clinical picture of chronic fatigue syndrome with FM (CFS/FM) becomes established.

While this will not offer a universal explanation to the development of CFS/FM it does put forward a provocative argument for many cases and should assist in managing stress or a system that needs a bit of stress to feel normal. May be this helps to explain why some CFS/FM sufferers do so well on natural agents such as TriAdren (a special blend of standardised adrenal supporting ingredients; ginseng liquorice root and vitamin C) while others feel such a benefit from agents designed to calm an over active HPA system such as Zen-Time with Lactium. In the case of the low functioning HPA system enhancement with graded exercise and carefully balanced adrenal stimulants such as those in TriAdren help to give the lift this subset of CFS/FM sufferers need while the central nervous system calming effects of the Lactium ingredient contained in the Zen-Time formula eases the agitation and stress related symptoms that typify an over active HPA system. Either way, managing CFS/FM is an ever evolving science and art but the basic science that underpins the simple act of withdrawing exercise and observing the effects on healthy individuals has open many new angles for further study.

Learn more about TriAdren at www.supersupps.com

Learn more about Zen-Time with Lactium (and take the FREE online stress test) at www.zen-time.co.uk

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Spice up your life to cool down inflammation

There has been quite a lot of press interest in the adverse effects of certain anti-inflammatory drugs and their potential to trigger a host of unwanted side effects including heart attacks. It’s no secret that most anti-inflammatory medications can play havoc with your stomach and gut but the news that taking these drugs could cause heart complications was quite a shock to those who have come to rely on these drugs to get them through the day. Interestingly, research over the years into the spice turmeric has revealed some encouraging results when used to treat pain and inflammation. Turmeric is composed of a complex mixture of organic compounds the principle one being curcumin. Although easily confused with the spice cumin, curcumin is completely unrelated and a unique compound to the spice turmeric. It belongs to a group of compounds called curcuminoids that are responsible for the typical yellow colour of turmeric. Anyone who has seen natural turumic root in the supermarket may notice a similarity to another culinary spice, ginger root. However, this is no coincidence because turmeric and ginger both belong to the same botanical family; Zingiberaceae. Both of these spices accumulate pharmacologically important compounds within the root tissue. In the case of turmeric the compounds are known as curcuminoids where as in ginger the compounds are called gingerols. The key fact that interests us is the ability of these compound to effectively reduce inflammation and pain while sparing other tissues the hazardous side effects commonly associated with anti-inflammatory medications. This may sound a bit to good to be true but to understand how turmeric, or more specifically the curcumoid known as curcumin, achieves this we will have to discuss the inflammatory process and a bit of biochemistry!

Inflammation – the basics.

When ever we injure ourselves the body has to mend the damage. To do this, chemicals need to be released that enhance blood supply, neutralise any invading bad bacteria and stimulate the local immune reaction. Over this early (acute) phase inflammation is accompanied by pain, swelling and some heat. In the majority of cases this process is self-limiting and once the injury has been mended all the levels settle to normal along with all the related symptoms. However, this is not always the case especially if there is an ongoing irritant present such as arthritis, joint damage or autoimmune disease. In these cases the inflammation becomes chronic and the sufferer experiences daily pain and disability. Anti-inflammatory drugs can offer great relief but often at a price and their safe long term use has become questionable.

Inflammation – the chemistry

The cascade of events that eventually causes inflammation kicks off within cell membranes. A specific fatty acid, known as arachidonic acid (AA), is released from it’s bound state within the cell membrane by an enzyme (phospholipase-A2). Two key players in the inflammation story, COX and LOX, then act upon the now freed AA. The COX enzyme comes in two forms, COX1 and COX 2. When AA interacts with COX1 it produces a mixture of compounds (prostaglandins; PG’s) that protect the stomach and maintain the ability of the blood to clot. When AA interacts with COX2 in produces PG’s that signal pain and enhance inflammation. The LOX enzyme converts AA into another powerful group of inflammatory compounds known as leukortrines. Drugs that block the COX and LOX enzymes are known as anti-inflammatory drugs for this reason; they block the inflammatory cascade. However, by blocking the COX1 enzyme these drugs also block the stomach and gut protective PG’s and cause thinning and blood vessel leaks as they also block the PG’s that maintain blood clotting. As a result, specific drugs were developed that selectively block the COX2 enzyme but leave the COX1 alone. In theory, this sounded great but in reality the drugs did leave the COX1 enzyme alone in the majority of tissues except the COX1 found within the cells that line the blood vessels. These cells are called endothelial cells and the COX1 enzyme within these cells produces a special compound known as prostacyclin, which in turn maintains the smooth flowing of the blood within the blood vessels. By blocking the action of endothelial COX1 and the production of prostacyclin blood becomes stickier and prone to clotting, which explained the increased heart attack risk associated with drugs that have COX2 inhibitor action.

Inflammation – the natural answer

Research into the anti-inflammatory actions of curcumin has revealed that curcumin is a safe and effective inhibitor of COX2 and of the LOX enzyme that is responsible for the generation of the powerful inflammatory actions of leukortrines. What’s more, curcumin has also been shown to block the initial release of AA from the cell membrane. By doing this curcumin may have an effective preventative action as well as a powerful anti-inflammatory effect when used on a regular basis. To date, there have been no indication or suggestion that curcumin inhibits the endothelial COX1.

One factor that goes against curcumin is it’s poor absorption from the digestive tract. To get around this problem manufacturers have produced a highly bio-available extract; Theracurmin. This innovative ingredient uses a microscopic particle (100 times smaller than regular curcumin powder) size to enhance the curcumin absorption from the gut. Studies using Theracurmin have shown that the microscopic curcumin particles are absorbed up to and reach concentrations 300 times higher than regular powders.

How to take curcumin supplements

Theracurmin is simple and easy to use; take 1-2 capsules daily around a meal time. Because of the lack of available information, those who are pregnant or breast feeding or taking warfarin should only use curcumin based products after taking medical advise.

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Don’t miss the window

Our skeleton starts off life as a delicate membrane-like template late in the second month of pregnancy but soon after the third month a primitive skeleton can be easily seen. Our bones form relatively early on because they are a key factor needed in the healthy growth and development of the growing baby. We tend to forget just how important a skeleton is but without it there would be nowhere for our muscles to attach and our vital internal organs would be extremely vulnerable to damage.

Throughout pregnancy, Mums-to-be are told to eat well and to get plenty of bone forming nutrients such as calcium. This advise extends to breast and bottle feeding and well into the weaning months and early years for good reason; the skeleton of a growing child is highly active and demands a plentiful supply or raw materials. However, there appear to be a gap somewhere between the early to mid teens and late 30’s where the focus of attention is taken away from skeletal health as other health priorities take the lime light and centre stage. For a growing number of people in this age bracket, weight management becomes an issue along with the trend for very restrictive diets in an attempt to drop the excessive weight. It’s not uncommon for levels of physical activity drop off especially in the school leaver population who either choose to avoid sports altogether or are forced into a more restrictive lifestyle that is so common in the digital workplace. Combine this with an increasing tendency to rely on processed and convenience foods and a lack of basic food, cooking and nutritional knowledge in many people and its quite easy to see how and why the early teen through to late 30’s are potentially hazardous to long term health. If we remain focused on the skeletal system, this phase of life is especially important considering that 90% of a girls skeletal mass is acquired by the age 18 and in boys by the age of 20. However, our bones keep developing reaching their lifetime peek mass by the age of 30 in both sexes. After this the skeleton remains quite stable until, in the case of women, the menopause starts when there can be a significant loss of bone mass. Men tend to loose bone mass slowly around the same phase of life but because of their greater skeletal size the effects are less noticeable in most cases. So, there appears to be window that can swing open for an opportunity to optimise skeletal health or slam shut, placing the maturing bone in jeopardy. Its rather like paying into a long term savers account or pension, you should have some reserves for later in life but it does mean you have to contribute early on and for many years to come with no real obvious outward signs of any benefit but in general you will be better off for the efforts.

The bare bones of skeletal nutrition We all know that calcium is important for bone health but it has been rather over played in the past. Our diets abound with calcium and the mature skeleton stores 99% of the bodies calcium reserves. In fact, our blood calcium levels are kept within such tight parameters that any fluctuation above or below the normal is considered a key sign of an underlying hormone disease rather than anything to do with dietary excess or deficiency. In saying that, calcium is still a vital bone mineral and one that is needed on a daily basis to maintain health. Despite many people having a problem in regards to sensitivity to allergy, milk and dairy products still provide a reliable and cost effective source of dietary calcium and protein. There have been some concerns raised about the intake of milk and an increased risk of thin bone disease but these claims have not been substantiated. In brief, the anti-milk theory suggests that the protein and phosphate naturally found in milk and dairy products make them ‘acid-producing’foods causing a shift in the bodies acid (pH) levels and triggering an accelerated loss of calcium from the bones and body; this process is not supported by any scientific evidence. Moreover, studies have confirmed that a higher phosphate intake was actually associated with decreased urine calcium and increased calcium retention. The theory then goes on to link this process with observations of thin bone related fractures in people from countries that consume a lot of milk and dairy foods; this is a case where correlation and causality can be misleading. Studies involving populations living and working in urban and rural environments yield quite different outcomes probably more related to their physical activity levels rather than to their milk and dairy food intake. While some people may find dairy foods a problem for those who do not a sensible level of intake would not appear to have any real detrimental effect on bone health and for some groups of people could be an important source of readily available protein and minerals. Check the tables below and see if you are getting enough calcium from your food (Table 1) compared to the recommended daily intake levels based on Western European, American and Canadian figures (Table 2).

Table 1: Calcium in common foods (apporoxamate)
Food Serving size Calcium (mg)
Milk, whole 236 ml 278
Milk, semi-skimmed 236 ml 283
Milk, skimmed 236 ml 288
Goats milk 236 ml 236
Yoghurt, low fat, plain 150 g 243
Yoghurt, low fat, fruit 150 g 210
Yoghurt, Greek style, fruit 150 g 189
Cheese, cheddar 40 g 296
Cheese, cottage 112 g 142
Tofu, soya bean, steamed 100 g 510
Soya drink 236 ml 31
Soya drink, calcium enriched 236 ml 210
Broccoli, cooked 112 g 45
Curley kale, cooked 112 g 168
Apricots, raw 160 g (1 fruit) 117
Orange 160 g (1 fruit) 75
Figs, ready to eat 220 g (4 fruits) 506
Almonds 26 g (12 whole) 62
Brazil nuts 20 g (6 whole) 34
Sardines, canned in oil 100 g (4 fish) 500
Pilchards, canned in tomato sauce 110 g (2 fish) 275
Whitebait, fried 80 g 688
Bread, white sliced 30 g (1 slice) 53
Bread, wholemeal, sliced 30 g (1 slice) 32
Pasta, plain, cooked 230 g 85
Rice, white, basmati, boiled 180 g 32
Table 2: Recommended daily intake of dietary calcium
Age Calcium (mg/day)
0-6 months 300-400
7-12 months 400
1-3 years 500
4-6 years 600
7-9 years 700
10-18 years 1300
Women
90 years to menopause 1000
Post menopause 1300
During pregnancy (1st trimester) 1200
Lactation 1000
Men
19-65 years 1000
65 + years 1300

As you can see from Table 1, getting adequate dietary calcium is not difficult but you need to know what too eat! A strict vegetarian who also avoids dairy foods will find it much harder to meet the minimum requirements for calcium without consuming specialist foods such as Tofu or taking a calcium supplement. Equally, someone following a strict weight loss may also fall short especially if they choose to follow the diet over a long term basis rather than modify their intake level across a balanced diet. Calcium is important but it is by no stretch of the imagination is it the key nutrient. What needs to be kept in mind is the fact that bone is a living tissue, its not simply a hard calcified mass. If it was it would be very prone to fracture because there would not be any flexibility or ‘give’in the skeleton when we jumped or ran. Proteins give bone its flexibility as well as a framework onto which the minerals (calcium, magnesium, phosphorous) can be deposited. A diet low in dietary protein is also detrimental to bone health. Fad diets that restrict proteins and poor general eating habits can that rely heavily on processed foods and carbohydrates starve the body of the essential protein building blocks of life known as amino acids. Key proteins from meat, fish, and eggs generally form the corner stone to human protein intake in Europe. In essence, there is nothing wrong with animal protein but there is no need to over consume from this food group since there are many great vegetable protein sources as well. Vegetarians and those seeking to rely less on animal proteins need to choose carefully but can increase their vegetable protein intake easily by eating more lentils, kidney beans and broad beans as well as soya, tofu, grain, nuts and seeds. By increasing the intake of vegetable proteins you will also be increasing the levels of other key bone nutrients including magnesium, zinc, B-vitamins (such as folic acid) and vitamin A generating beta carotene especially if you regularly eat the coloured vegetables such as orange, yellow and red peppers.   Absorb it or loose it In order to benefit from the calcium in your diet or from your supplement adequate levels of vitamin D are required. Over the past few years vitamin D has become a hot-topic in the press where it has been associated with many health problems ranging from MS through to certain types of cancers and even depression and psoriasis when levels are grossly deficient. The situation involving vitamin D and it’s involvement in such a variety of health problems is complex, poorly understood and undoubtedly linked to genetic susceptibility but when it comes to bone health the cause and effect relationship is very well understood and established. Vitamin D is not an easy vitamin to get in Northern European countries simply because of the lack of intense sunlight (more specifically the ultraviolet-B rays) needed to stimulate its production within the skin. Here we hit another controversy, by recommending sun exposure are we now putting people at risk of skin cancer? The simple answer is no! Just remember that sun exposure is healthy, sun burn is not. Getting 15-20 minutes of sun light per day, best between 10am and 2pm when the sun is at its peek, is all that is needed to boost natural vitamin D levels. For those of us at work stuck inside, shift workers or people confined to inside living some vitamin D can be obtained from a few foods (for example; salmon, mackerel, tuna, sardines, egg and liver) but to get enough you will need to eat quite a lot of it and on a very regular basis to meet the requirements for health let alone optimal health and there is no real vegetarian food option that delivers any vitamin D. In regards to vitamin D the only real option is a supplement especially over the winter periods. Intake recommendations for vitamin D vary greatly but supplements should be in the vitamin D3 form and need to be between 400iu (10mcg) to 1000iu (25mcg) in strength per day unless you have had a vitamin D blood test and need to significantly boost your levels under supervision. If you can’t get a blood test from your own GP we can always arrange this for you but the private lab will carry a lab fee of around £60 per test for a calcium and vitamin D test. You can take your own blood sample at home (a finger prick) and posted off to the lab for analysis. Another vital vitamin for bone health is vitamin K. This is required for the formation of specific bone proteins that actively help to build and strengthen the framework needed a healthy skeleton. Vitamin K is obtained from dark green leafy vegetables such as kale, cabbage and spinach as well as from lettuce. There are more specialist foods made from fermented soybeans that deliver high amounts of vitamin K. A good bone supplement should supply vitamin K but this needs to be avoided in anyone taking anticoagulant medication such as warfarin. Those on warfarin should not increase their vitamin K containing foods form the same reason.

Special situations The window for optimising bone health can be significantly helped by diet and lifestyle choices but there are a few occasions when other health issues can complicate things. People with certain digestive problems that adversely affect nutrient absorption, such a Coeliac disease and some inflammatory bowel problems, need special individualised attention and advise. This may also extend to the long term use of steroid based medications because of its adverse impact on bone health.

Dietary supplements While we have placed great emphasis on food, diet and what can be achieved through lifestyle adjustment, the use of a specific dietary supplement aimed at optimising bone specific nutrition may be appropriate in many cases. The bone specific supplement Calci-D-min delivers a highly absorbable plant calcium known as Aquamin (derived from red algae) that’s easy on the stomach and quickly absorbed and assimilated by the body. Aquamin also delivers magnesium and 74 other naturally occurring trace elements contained in the red algae. The Calci-D-min supplement has been formulated to supply effective levels of vitamin D3, K1 and K2 along with boron selenium and zinc. Depending on the diet, as food supplement two to four capsules are recommended taken with food. Because of the vitamin K ingredient, Calci-D-min is not recommended for anyone taking the anticoagulant drug warfarin. The product is 100% vegetarian and fully approved by the Vegetarian Society.

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The Mind-Skin Connection

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Christina offers Counselling and Psychotherapy at Hadley Wood Healthcare

For many people suffering from dermatitis or eczema the exact cause of their problem can be a mystery. Despite following restricted diets, undergoing allergy testing and numerous drug and natural therapies the skin problem continues… if this rings bells with you or someone you know may be its time to take a closer look at the emotional aspects of your life and consider how this may be maintaining your skin problem. Many doctors agree that stress can trigger and aggravate eczema but few offer any real practical solutions other than anti-depressant medication. This is where talking therapies come into their own.

What is eczema 


Eczema is a condition and general term for many different types of inflammation of the skin. There may be many factors which cause eczema such as  sensitive skin to soaps, cosmetics, detergents as well as psychological stress and anxiety. 

Causes of eczema – how stress impact your skin
Your skin is an organ, just like your heart is. Your heart responds to stress and anxiety by beating faster, the stomach responds to stress by creating ulcers or other digestive problems. The skin is no different – it is sensitive to emotions and situations – shock may turn your skin pale, embarrassment makes you blush, and stress and anxiety can trigger skin problems such as eczema. When you become stressed, the level of cortisol (stress hormone) rises in the body which causes oil production to increase which flows to the skin. Cortisol also stops the water production in the skin, so this reduces the skin’s ability to repair itself.

Mind and body connection – Your thoughts do have a direct impact upon your body, and your body has a direct impact on your thoughts. The mind and body also responds to emotions. So it is important to build a bridge linking the mind and body connection and your inner emotions to help develop a stronger inner and outer you.

Counselling – Eczema may be your body’s way of expressing and releasing something which you may find difficult to do, perhaps it is stress, anxiety or related to a stressful incident or traumatic experiencing. Therapy helps to create awareness, understanding, process and movement which helps to facilitate long-lasting change.

Relaxation – By combining relaxation, breathing and stress management into your life, you will start to feel calmer and much more stronger to be able to cope with life’s ups and downs. When you feel calm, your skin and body relaxes too.
I recommend a book by, Louise Hay, ‘You can Heal your Life’

You can contact and consult Christina at Hadley Wood Healthcare on 0208 441 8352

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Vitamin D Levels: Should Be Higher in People Taking Certain Osteoporosis Drugs, Experts Say

We have posted a fair few articles regarding vitamin D and the acculumating evidence does appear to suggest that current intakes and levels are too low for optimal health epeciually where our bones are concerned. As we all know now, Vitamin D works with calcium to help strengthen bones but the ongoing research into this area is suggesting that adequate levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream also appear to boost the power of bisphosphonates. These are the most prescribed drugs used to treat osteoporosis. The most recent study adds to the evidence that the current recommendations for vitamin D may be too low. Late last year, the Institute of Medicine (an American organisation) issued a report that declined to make changes to the recommendation despite many new studies supporting the need for more vitamin D than is typically consumed. In the UK, the National Osteoporosis Society only goes so far as to say; “However, older people, those who do not go out much and people who cover up for religious or cultural reasons may become deficient and 400 iu (international units), or 10 mcg (micrograms), a day is recommended.” If the acculumating work is correct, 400IU’s of vitamin D are well below what is actually needed! In the new study, presented at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, researchers found that having a circulating vitamin D level greater than 33 nanograms per milliliter was linked to a seven times greater likelihood of having a good response to bisphosphonates. Bisphosphonates include medications such as Fosamax, Boniva and Actonel. The standard vitamin D blood test measures a component called 25-hydroxy vitamin D and according to the American IOM report, levels of 50 nmol/l to 75 nmol/l (20 ng/ml to 30 ng/ml) are adequate for most normal, healthy adults while in the UK a level below 25 nmol/l (10 ng/ml) is consistent with deficiency with levels between 30-50 nmol/l ( 75-124.8 ng/ml ) being considered a sign of vitamin D “insufficiency”. However, these levels have not been amended since 2006 when the journal Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin published the guidelines. Before we progress… lets get out units sorted out! In American studies vitamin D levels are published in units known as nanograms per militer (ng/ml) where as in the UK the units used are nanomoles per litre (nmol/l). In this post I will display both values for clarity. Vitamin D itself tends to be described in International Units (IU) where 1IU = 0.025 mcg (micrograms). However, in the new study, 83% of people with vitamin D levels less than 50 nmol/l (20 ng/ml) had a poor response to bisphosphonates compared with 77% of people with levels between 50 nmol/l to 75 nmol/l (20 ng/ml and 30 ng/ml), 42% of people with levels of 70 nmol – 100 nmol/l (30 ng/ml to 40 ng/ml) and 24% of those exceeding 100 nmol/l (40 ng/ml). “There has been a lot of controversy over the correct vitamin D levels for people to have,” said the lead author of the study, Dr. Richard Bockman, chief of the endocrine service at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, in a news release. He concluded by saying that “Vitamin D status should be optimized to improve outcomes in patients taking bisphosphonates.” While the experts trash out the data it looks safe to say that we are, in general, seeing more cases of vitamin D deficiency than previously thought and it would be good to increase the following foods (salmon, tuna, liver, sardines, eggs) or consider a supplement especially over the winter!

Resources 

Hospital for Special Surgery news release 

About Dr Richard Bockman
Down load the IOM guidelines on vitamin D and calcium intake click here

National Osteoporosis Society healthy bones information

Product links

Vitamin D3 1000iu supplements

Vitamin D3 2000iu supplements

Bone specific multi-formula

Liquid Vitamin D and Calcium product

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