Have you heard of quercetin – if not read on…

Quercetin is a natural substance, known as a bioflavonoid, that’s found in red wine, onions, and green tea. It’s been clinically shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause. They also help keep LDL (“bad”) cholesterol from being damaged, which scientists think may contribute to heart disease. growing interest in this compound has developed with the finding that it acts like an antihistamine and an anti-inflammatory. some research also indicates that it may help protect against heart disease and cancer.
At this time of year hayfever and allergic asthma starts to peek. Since quercetin prevents immune cells from releasing histamines, chemicals that cause allergic reactions, its use at this time of year may offer new hope to hay fever sufferers. Researchers think that quercetin may help reduce symptoms of allergies, including runny nose, watery eyes and may be hives.
Work on quercetin is ongoing and the research data is accululating with good indications that as a natural supplement it may help in the battle against heart disease. It has been noted that since it prevents LDL cholesterol from being damaged buy oxidation artery disease may be prevented.  One study found that people who took quercetin and an alcohol-free red wine extract (which contains quercetin) had less damage to LDL cholesterol. Recent studies have also found a positive effect in cases of prostatitis. This condition is typically difficult to manage so the use of a simple supplement may come as great relief to prostatitis sufferers!
As previopusley mentioned, this compound is found normally in the diet. Fruits and vegetables (particularly citrus fruits, apples, onions, parsley, tea, and red wine) are the best dietary sources of quercetin. Olive oil, grapes, dark cherries, and dark berries (especially the dark coloured ones eg.blueberries, blackberries, and bilberries) are also high in flavonoids, including quercetin. Eating a diet rich in these is always a good idea but those with specific health needs will probably find a supplement a good idea.
In general, for allergy problems its woirth trying 500-600mg per day increasing to 500mg twice a day in cases of severe inflammation such as prostatitis.
As far as interactions with drugs goies, its generally accecpted that blood thinners such as Warfarin (Coumadin), Clopidogrel (Plavix) and Aspirin may interact with quercetin and its not recommended that you take it if you are on these. There is some suggestion that the immune suppressant drug called Cyclosporine may pose a problem because of quercetins ability to apparently blosk its absorbtion. Other drugs that have been implicated as interaction are nifedipine, and felodipine.
Quercetin is a natural substance, known as a bioflavonoid, that’s found in red wine, onions, and green tea. It’s been clinically shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause. They also help keep LDL (“bad”) cholesterol from being damaged, which scientists think may contribute to heart disease. growing interest in this compound has developed with the finding that it acts like an antihistamine and an anti-inflammatory. some research also indicates that it may help protect against heart disease and cancer.At this time of year hayfever and allergic asthma starts to peek. Since quercetin prevents immune cells from releasing histamines, chemicals that cause allergic reactions. On that basis, researchers think that quercetin may help reduce symptoms of allergies, including runny nose, watery eyes and may be hives. Work on quercetin is ongoing and the research data is accululating with good indications that as a natural supplement it may help in the battle against heart disease. It has been noted that since it prevents LDL cholesterol from being damaged buy oxidation artery disease may be prevented.  One study found that people who took quercetin and an alcohol-free red wine extract (which contains quercetin) had less damage to LDL cholesterol. Recent studies have also found a positive effect in cases of prostatitis. This condition is typically difficult to manage so the use of a simple supplement may come as great relief to prostatitis sufferers! As previopusley mentioned, this compound is found normally in the diet. Fruits and vegetables (particularly citrus fruits, apples, onions, parsley, tea, and red wine) are the best dietary sources of quercetin. Olive oil, grapes, dark cherries, and dark berries (especially the dark coloured ones eg.blueberries, blackberries, and bilberries) are also high in flavonoids, including quercetin.
Eating a diet rich in these is always a good idea but those with specific health needs will probably find a supplement a good idea.In general, for allergy problems its woirth trying 500-600mg per day increasing to 500mg twice a day in cases of severe inflammation such as prostatitis.
As far as interactions with drugs goies, its generally accecpted that blood thinners such as Warfarin (Coumadin), Clopidogrel (Plavix) and Aspirin may interact with quercetin and its not recommended that you take it if you are on these. There is some suggestion that the immune suppressant drug called Cyclosporine may pose a problem because of quercetins ability to apparently blosk its absorbtion. Other drugs that have been implicated as interaction are nifedipine, and felodipine.
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